Access 2007 VBA Programming For Dummies BY Joseph C. Stockman, Alan Simpson

Access 2007 VBA Programming For Dummies BY Joseph C. Stockman, Alan Simpson
Item# 10101640018
Retail price: US$24.99
Sale price: US$2.00

all items in this store are to be sent to your email within 24 hours after cleared payment. PDF eBooks are sent to you as email attachments. as for mp3 audiobook, a download link from ONEDRIVE will be sent to your email for you to download.

1. This item is an E-Book in PDF format.

2. Shipping & Delivery: Send to you by E-mail within 24 Hours after cleared payment. Immediately Arrival!!!

3. Shipping ( by email) + Handling Fee = US$0.00

4. Time-Limited Offer, Order Fast.

*************************************************************************





Access 2007 VBA Programming For Dummies

BY Joseph C. Stockman, Alan Simpson



Wiley

Adobe E-Book 386 pages May 2007

f you¡¯ve been using Access for a while, you¡¯re probably aware of its power and potential and itching to take advantage of both. Access 2007 VBA Programming For Dummies takes you beyond forms and reports and shows you how to use VBA to create killer Access databases and applications. This gentle introduction to VBA programming covers everything you need to get started, including:

Basic programming skills and concepts

Explanations of modules, procedures, objects, and arguments

Access-unique programming activities, including SQL and recordsets

How to use the Visual Basic editor

Creating dialog boxes, lists, drop-down menus, and functions

Integrating with other Office applications

Ready-to-use VBA code examples to type in or copy and paste from the Web

Completely revised to reflect all changes found in Microsoft Access 2007, Access 2007 VBA Programming For Dummies gives you access to Access like you¡¯ve never had it before.





AUTHOR INFORMATION:

Joe Stockman is an independent consultant, software designer, and author who has been using Microsoft Access since its initial release. He¡¯s also developed courseware and taught classes in Access and VBA. Joe developed his first application in Access, and then migrated into Visual Basic and VB.NET, where he specializes in creating applications for the Windows Mobile platform. He worked for several software companies before forming his consulting business in 2002, where he deals with all types of clients including healthcare, financial, government, manufacturing, and small business. His ability to turn his customers¡¯ wishes into working applications keeps them satisfied. Joe¡¯s also writing the fundamentals column for the Advisor Guide to Microsoft Access magazine.



Introduction. Part I: Introducing VBA Programming.

Chapter 1: Where VBA Fits In.

Chapter 2: Your VBA Toolkit.

Chapter 3: Jumpstart: Creating a Simple VBA Program.

Part II: VBA Tools and Techniques.

Chapter 4: Understanding Your VBA Building Blocks.

Chapter 5: Controlling Access through VBA.

Chapter 6: Programming Access Forms.

Part III: VBA, Recordsets, and SQL.

Chapter 7: The Scoop on SQL and Recordsets.

Chapter 8: Putting Recordsets to Work.

Part IV: Applying VBA in the Real World.

Chapter 9: Creating Your Own Dialog Boxes.

Chapter 10: Customizing Combo Boxes and List Boxes.

Chapter 11: Creating Your Own Functions.

Chapter 12: Testing and Debugging Your Code.

Part V: Reaching Out with VBA.

Chapter 13: Using VBA with Multiple Databases.

Chapter 14: Integrating with Other Office Applications.

Part VI: The Part of Tens.

Chapter 15: Ten Commandments of Writing VBA.

Chapter 16: Top Ten Nerdy VBA Tricks.

Index.



Alan Simpson is the author of over 100 computer books on databases, Windows, Web site design and development, programming, and networking. His books are published throughout the world in over a dozen languages and have millions of copies. Alan has also taught introductory and advanced computer programming courses at San Diego State University and the UCSD Extension. He has served as a consultant on high-technology, educationoriented projects for the United States Navy and Air Force. Despite that, Alan has no fancy job title because he has never had a real job.



TABLE OF CONTENTS: