Accounting and Business Valuation Methods: how to interpret IFRS accounts BY Malcolm Howard

Accounting and Business Valuation Methods: how to interpret IFRS accounts BY Malcolm Howard
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Accounting and Business Valuation Methods:

how to interpret IFRS accounts

BY Malcolm Howard



Publisher: CIMA Publishing (December 14, 2007)





Product Description

This book is intended to appeal to junior accountants and entrepreneurs who need guidance and practical analytical tools to enable them to develop business plans, raise capital and assess risk. Readers can initiate their own business plans by copying over 200 lines of formulae that create a 5 year plan that includes an earnings statement (or profit and loss account), balance sheet and cash flow statement. It will also appeal to students taking accounting and finance modules that cover basic accounting techniques, ratio analysis, investment appraisal, as well as company valuation and share valuation. The book demonstrates with four case studies where practice often differs with theory.

Chapter 1 covers basic book-keeping, showing how accounts are reconciled and controlled covering topics such as the working capital cycle and negotiating techniques. Chapter 2 deals with basic business planning and how to use ratio analysis (performance, asset management, structure, and investment ratios) to assess company performance. Chapter 3 explains that published accounts are based on a series of judgements and the effect the relatively new international financial reporting standards and legislation such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act is having on corporate governance. Chapter 4 covers risk assessment and valuing companies. Four case studies bring everything together; how investment trusts are valued, the effect of restructuring on share prices, the difference between serious profit warnings and mere compliance with regulation and hostile takeovers.

Via a thorough analysis of published accounts this book will show readers how to: distinguish between mandatory and optional reports; assess the strength of a company's balance sheet; assess the risk factors associated with investment; assess whether or not the market value of a particular company is justified.



* examines the difference between mandatory and optional reports

* explains how to assess the strength of a companys balance sheet

* looks at how to assess whether or not the market value of a particular company is justified



From the Back Cover

Accounts always tell a story..

In this exciting new book, Malcolm Howard breathes life into balance sheets, incorporating the story of a start-up business, from initial conception to final acquisition. Along the way learn about double entry book-keeping, how to prepare a trial balance, profit and loss account and balance sheet as well as the working capital cycle, asset management and how to negotiate with banks.

The author brings a wealth of experience from both a practitioner and academic viewpoint and four carefully selected case studies from recent years (including the company accounts) show theory put into practice in several high profile companies.

This book offers a detailed guide to the several different methods of ascertaining the value of a business, taking into account the move away from UK GAAP towards International Financial Reporting Standards.

Evaluate the true value of a business by fully understanding the narrative of company accounts with emphasis on the judgement that is required to interpret financial information.