Peter Lynch - Beating The Street (audiobook mp3)

Peter Lynch - Beating The Street (audiobook mp3)
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Peter Lynch - Beating The Street (audiobook mp3)

Publisher: Sound Ideas; Abridged edition (April 1, 1993)



From Publishers Weekly Until retiring in 1990, Lynch ( One Up on Wall Street ) was manager of the spectacularly successful Fidelity Magellan Fund. Here he recalls with self-deprecating humor and disarming candor how he went about choosing winning stocks (and missing a few) for the $12 billion fund, which, during one five-year period in the 1980s, earned investors a 300% return. Lynch strongly favors stocks over other investment vehicles but insists that "investigative" research into a corporation's prospects, including credit checks and visits to the firm's installations, is essential. "Focus on companies, not the stocks," he stresses, adding that on this basis limited partnerships, banks and even S & Ls can be sound investments. Lynch's reputation and business writer Rothchild's deft touch should yield big sales for this inside story. Major ad/promo; first serial to Money magazine; BOMC and Fortune Book Club alternates; author tour. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. From Library Journal Lynch is the master stock picker who led Magellan (until May 1990) to its position as America's biggest mutual fund. In One Up on Wall Street (Simon & Schuster, 1989), also written with Rothchild, he described his winning methods. Here, he provides a few more elaborations and 21 "Peter's principles." Some are overly clever, e.g., being first in line is a great idea except on the edge of a cliff. Lynch takes three chapters to explain how he "done it good" at Magellan. One valuable chapter details methods for picking a mutual fund from the thousands available, but most of the book is devoted to demonstrating his research into picking the 21 stocks he recommended in the January 1992 Barron's roundtable. Still, since the average investor will not get to talk to the CEO or visit the company in person, maybe we should all just buy Lynch's recommendations each year. A tossup. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 11/1/92. - Alex Wenner, Indiana Univ. Libs., Bloomington



During the thirteen years Peter Lynch was the manager of the Fidelity Magellan Fund until his retirement in 1990, Magellan was the top-ranked general equity mutual fund. An investment of $1,000 in Magellan in 1977 was worth $28,000 in 1990. Time called Lynch the nation's "#1 money manager." Now Peter Lynch shows investors how he puts his investing philosophy and techniques into action as he takes readers step-by-step through the process of selecting the stocks he recommended at the 1992 Barron's Roundtable. (And he describes how he followed these companies through most of the year to see how their stories unfolded and tells us whether, at the end of nine months, he recommended the reader buy, sell, or hold the stocks.). Lynch also examines his years at the Magellan Fund, analyzing the reasons why he outperformed all other fund managers. He discloses that it was a small number of major success stories ("10-baggers") that were the principal reason for the fund's superior record. He draws a lesson for the average investor: there are good companies looking for investors, and it takes only one or two good companies a decade to turn a portfolio from an average performer into a winner. Finally, in what may be the most valuable section of the book, Lynch offers advice on devising a mutual-fund strategy. Not surprisingly, he believes that the key to any mutual-fund portfolio is stocks, not bonds, and he recommends a mix of growth funds, value funds, and blue-chip funds. He explains how to adjust new investments among these different types of funds. Beating the Street also tells the wonderful story of a group of seventh graders who, following Lynch's advice to invest in what they knew,outperformed nearly every fund manager on Wall Street.